Tag Archives: Sysadmin

getting refund for your preinstalled Windows

As we all know, it can be quite difficult to purchase a computer without a preinstalled version of Microsoft Windows. However, if for whatever reason you don’t want to use the preinstalled software (Windows, Office, Works, …), you are eligible for a refund as defined in the end users licence agreement that comes with products Continue Reading →

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the not so easy migration from VMWare server to KVM for Windows guests

As previously written [1], we are currently migrating our existing VMWare Server 2.0 guests to KVM, running on Debian sid [2] installations (yes, sid indeed, for the sake of a KVM installation as up2date as possible). While things have been really extremely flawless for linux guests, the migration of our Windows guests has more been Continue Reading →

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kvm: windows 2000 does not boot because ntoskrnl.exe is missing or corrupt

We are currently in the process of migrating all our VMWare virtual hosts to KVM [1]. Sometimes this can be quite difficult because KVM apparently has some issues with older guest OS such was Windows 2000. So, if you try to boot Windows 2000, you might fail like this: Disk I/o error: Status = 00000001Disk Continue Reading →

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finding out details about installed RAM on a Linux box

The tool of choice for getting detailled technical hardware information in Linux these days is dmidecode [1]. If you have a compatible BIOS that follows theSMBIOS/DMI [2] and [3] standard (very likely for any modern computer), you can use it to retrieve information about memory, processor, connectors on the mainboard and much more. Usage is Continue Reading →

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port security: proxying KVM MAC addresses with Debian Lenny

Following the desaster that occurred when we tried to install a virtual server on a dedicated Hetzner.com root server [1], we had to find a workaround for the problem. The problem itself was that the KVM instance would use it’s own MAC address and thus port security [2] struck us hard, leaving the physical server Continue Reading →

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